Ibogaine and Addiction – Article from “The Valley Reporter”

“In late April, the Vermont House Committee on Human Services heard testimony from individuals regarding a unique type of treatment for a highly pervasive problem that plagues the state – opiate addiction. “The treatment that was under review is called ibogaine, a psychoactive chemical derived from the root of an African plant known to the West as iboga. In past research, it has been found to drastically reduce withdrawal symptoms, which one patient struggling with opiate dependence called “the flu times 5 billion.” “The treatment can also reduce the psychological desire to use substances like opiates in the long term, facilitated by a period of deep insight through an altered state of consciousness. Some have described this as a dreamlike state and others speak about a three-dimensional slideshow of hallucinations behind their closed eyelids.” Read more at – http://www.valleyreporter.com/stories/news/11377-visionary-plant-leads-many-out-of-addiction...
Are You Enabling Your Addicted Loved One?

Are You Enabling Your Addicted Loved One?

It’s hard to watch someone we care about struggle with addiction. We want to help them in any way we can, but often what we think is helping is actually doing more harm than good. Addiction is a multi-faceted and very complex condition that has a tendency to tear families apart and ruin lives. It’s understandable that family members or close friends would want to do whatever they can to help their addicted loved one, but there is a very fine line between helping someone and enabling their addiction. Helping vs. Enabling While the line between the two can become pretty blurry, there is actually clear distinction between the two when you know what to look for. At some point it’s practically impossible not to want to help someone you love that’s struggling with addiction. But are you helping them or making their addiction all the easier? Helping an addict is just that. You’re doing something for them that they’re unable to do for themselves. Enabling is doing something for them that they’re perfectly capable of doing themselves. Here’s where things begin to get tricky. Say the addict you love couldn’t pay their rent for the month. Are you helping them by offering financial assistance (just this once) or enabling their behavior by allowing them to believe that this is something they can get away with? They’re perfectly capable of paying rent, only their addiction somehow got in the way…no matter what excuse they may have. This is a case of enabling, not helping someone out who’s in need. It’s important to know the difference, because it could make...
Parents of Addicts – Dealing With an Addict and Offering Love

Parents of Addicts – Dealing With an Addict and Offering Love

No parent wants to lose their child to drug addiction. Too many families however are facing this sobering reality. Statistics show that the 15-24 age range is at the highest risk for overdosing among teens and young adults, which is a very frightening thought to parents who have addicted children. As parents it’s only natural to want what’s best for your children. Seeing them go down the wrong path can be difficult. As much as you try to guide them in the right direction, teens and young adults are often going to do whatever they want no matter how much sound advice to try to offer. Once your child has slipped into addiction, life becomes but a shadow of what it once was. Watching anyone succumb to addiction is hard, but when it’s your own child it can be devastating. Not only does it trigger feelings of tremendous pain and guilt, but it can be all-consuming and utterly exhausting. A Myriad of Negative Emotions Emotions are on overdrive to say the least. From the roller coaster of ups and downs you watch your child experience to the anger, shame, and total hopelessness you often feel as a parent, the journey of being the parent of an addict is a rough road indeed. If you’re the parent of an addict, it’s no doubt you feel (or have felt at some point) that your child’s current state is somehow your fault. It’s not, but telling yourself that can be an entirely different story. Many parents come to accept responsibility for their child’s addiction, and end up run raw and rampant because...
Difference Between Drugs and Medicine

Difference Between Drugs and Medicine

Drugs and medicine are seemingly interchangeable, but there is indeed a difference between the two. While a trip to the doctor might warrant a prescription for medicine, these prescriptions are also known as drugs. Prescription drugs, prescription medication. What’s the difference and when does one become the other? The Blending of Medication and Addiction Drugs are considered to be such things as stimulants, narcotics, and hallucinogens, and often are used in the medical field to treat or cure disease. Medicine, however, is our term for a drug when that drug is used to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent a disease. Many people become addicted to drugs even when used as medicine. However, often times an addict will continue to take the drugs even after the medicinal use has been treated. So although there is often a clear distinction what happens when the lines of medicine and addiction become crossed? It’s no secret that America is a nation hooked on pharmaceutical “medicine.” In 2012, there were 259 million prescriptions written for opioids. This is enough to give every American adult their own bottle of pills. While opioids are considered medicine and prescribed freely, they’re also extremely addictive. Here is where the lines of addiction and medicine become blurry and begin to come together until the medication is the addiction. Addiction to opioids is a very real problem, one that some describe as something that “just creeps up on you”. Running the Risk of Addiction from Prescription Medication Even when medicine like prescription opioids is only taken to control pain, the risk for addiction is still there. Many people who have...
Defining Addiction: The difference between addiction and dependence

Defining Addiction: The difference between addiction and dependence

There’s a fine line between abuse and addiction when it comes to drug and alcohol use. The difference can be hard to decipher. Some people believe that dependence and addiction are the same, however, there is a rather distinct division of the two. Dependency Dependency is what people allude to when they’re talking about physical dependency on a substance. People that are dependent on a substance will usually go into physical withdrawal, and quite often have a very high tolerance to their substance of choice. You can be physically addicted to a substance without being a full-blown addict, but if drug or alcohol use continues then addiction tends to loom in the very near future. Addiction Addiction also constitutes one being physically dependent on a substance, but it also includes much, much more. When someone has reached the point of addiction, their substance of choice pretty much becomes their main concern. Behavior becomes erratic and the person they were is often not the person they’ve become. For the addict there are periods of extreme highs and very low lows. If an addict doesn’t have whatever they’re addicted to their actions will show it. Withdrawal when you’re addicted isn’t pretty. People tend to act unreasonable and irrational, and may not seem like themselves at all. Symptoms of addiction include: Changes in Appearance By the time someone is addicted, it’s likely the way they look has begun to change. From poor hygiene and an unkempt appearance to sallow skin and weight loss, the physical conditions of addicts can go from bad to worse very quickly. In some cases people become unrecognizable...
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