Admitting You Have An Addiction

Admitting You Have An Addiction

There comes a point in an addict’s life that they will admit to others that they have a substance abuse problem. Admitting you have an addiction can be extremely terrifying, but is often the first step towards sobriety and a life that isn’t fueled by drugs or alcohol. Lasting success in addiction recovery is a long road and begins with telling those you love about your addiction. Admitting Your Addiction is the First Step There aren’t many addicts that want the people they love and care about to know that they have a problem. If you’re addicted to drugs or alcohol, you most likely work pretty hard on hiding your dependency. The people you respect and care about are the last ones you want to know about your addiction. However, in order to get the help you so desperately need, your loved ones are the people you need on your side. Because addiction completely changes the behavior of a person, telling others can be extremely overwhelming. Your actions as an addict are most likely worlds away from the person you really are. It can feel really difficult to tell a loved one you’re an addict when your behavior has caused pain, anger, sadness, and confusion. It’s easy to hurt the ones you love when you’re an addict. They are, after all, the closest people to you. There are many ways people who are addicted hurt the ones they love, whether it’s intentional or not. Addiction doesn’t just affect the addict. Addiction makes an individual do things they normally wouldn’t do. Addicts will blatantly lie to those they love, steal...
Finding a Local Support Group

Finding a Local Support Group

Seeking treatment for addiction is only one step of the process involved in overcoming dependency to drugs and alcohol. Seeking support after your treatment in order to help get you through the transition is crucial. Without support, it’s easy to stay stuck in addictive patterns, or relapse after addiction treatment is over. The desire to relapse can be hard to overcome on your own, making the need to find a local support group is vital. You Have a Choice When it Comes to Finding Addiction Support There are many different types of support networks when it comes to overcoming addiction. Most everyone is familiar with Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and other 12-step programs. They can be found pretty much anywhere, and countless people have attended them and attested to their effectiveness. There have been many studies conducted that claim these programs are successful, and for some they truly are and can be life changing for a recovering addict. There are, however, just as many people that haven’t seen the success they’re hoping for in attending these programs. In fact, the success rate of 12 step programs such as AA fall somewhere around 5-10 percent. This may come as a surprise to those who’ve been led to believe that programs such as these are the end all, be all for recovering addicts looking to make a positive change. However, any support group is better than not having one at all. AA Isn’t the Only Option Others are surprised to learn that there are actually other types of support groups that don’t follow the creed of traditional 12 step programs that may...
Could Psilocybin Hold the Key to Quitting Smoking?

Could Psilocybin Hold the Key to Quitting Smoking?

Using psychedelics to treat addiction is nothing new. Ayahuasca, LSD, Ibogaine, and psilocybin have all shown to be effective when it comes to helping addicts overcome addiction…and for good reason. They’ve been shown to work remarkably well in treating addiction at the root of the problem—the brain. Because psychedelics are deemed by the federal government to be some of the most dangerous drugs in existence, research on their benefits have been difficult to discover. There are those, however, that have been able to perform studies on psychedelics with promising results. One study that did just that was performed at John Hopkins, and what was found could change the lives of cigarette smokers (and most likely other addicts) forever. Psilocybin (the compound found in “magic mushrooms”) has shown therapeutically benefits in the past for people suffering from depression, substance abuse, and cluster headaches. Researchers at John Hopkins decided to see if this psychedelic substance could help people struggling to quit smoking cigarettes. The results they found were remarkable. The study consisted of 15 people who had, on average, smoked for some thirty years. 10 males and 5 females participated in the study, all of whom had tried (unsuccessfully) to quit before. Several of them had “quit” up to six different times. Anyone who’s ever attempted to quit smoking for good knows just how difficult and demanding this addiction really is. Participants were given three separate doses of psilocybin over an eight-week period. The first dose of 20mg/70kg was given on the first day, with two subsequent doses of 30mg/70kg over the next eight weeks. Each session was performed in a...
How to Avoid Relapse After Ibogaine

How to Avoid Relapse After Ibogaine

If you’ve recently completed Ibogaine treatment, you’re aware of the feeling of elation it can leave you with. No other drug or alcohol treatment works quite the same, and many have reported feeling a complete shift in perception after treatment is completed. The thing is, no addiction treatment (no matter how good it makes you feel afterwards) is a guarantee of permanent sobriety. Relapse can become reality if the proper steps aren’t taken after treatment is over. Addiction treatment with Ibogaine is no different. And, though its success rate is one of the highest when it comes to successfully treating addiction, there isn’t a former addict known who hasn’t faced the temptation to use once treatment is over. Getting Real About Relapse The percentage of people who will relapse after addiction treatment may come as a big surprise. Many think that initially overcoming addiction is the hard part…and that after treatment life just gets easier. This, however, is unfortunately far from the reality at hand. Some 50-90% of people who seek addiction treatment will relapse. Statistics like these don’t offer much hope to those looking to get clean and sober for good. What these statistics don’t tell you is the reasons behind these relapses. Relapse can absolutely be avoided, but it’s up to the addict themselves to take the steps necessary to increase the rate of lasting sobriety. Aftercare is something many people who relapse don’t even consider, but is something vital for sustained sobriety. Support is also something that can help someone avoid relapse. Those without support from friends or family after addiction treatment is completed have shown...
Eliminating the Bias: How Psychedelics Got a Bad Rap

Eliminating the Bias: How Psychedelics Got a Bad Rap

Before psychedelics were deemed dangerous and illegal for use in the late 1960s, they’d already been used for thousands of years by different cultures around the world. Before the heyday of the 1960s and 70s where free love reigned and people were dropping acid like it was candy, psychedelic substances played an integral part of accessing different realms of consciousness and were used primarily for healing purposes. For centuries there have been various people worldwide that have used psychedelics, and it’s only been within the last fifty years that such a backlash against these substances has been so prominent. After LSD was synthesized in the late 1930s, it was used widely throughout the 40s and 50s as a treatment for addiction (namely to alcohol), depression, and a number of other psychiatric conditions. There were, however, others that were using LSD and it wasn’t for the deep psychological healing it was first used for. LSD and other psychedelics, like psilocybin mushrooms, were used widely throughout the counterculture of the time and soon became a symbol of rebellious youth and social disruption. There are many different opinions on why exactly psychedelics were banned, some highlighting the dangers of psychedelics while others saw them as nothing more than recreational drugs with no intrinsic value. Pay no mind that between 1950 and 1965 over 40,000 people were treated with LSD, many with extremely promising results. Before psychedelics were banned, they were being researched for the auspicious qualities they were known to contain. In 1960, Dr. Timothy Leary began to study the effect of psychedelic psilocybin mushrooms under the Harvard Psilocybin Project. This lasted...
The Crossroads Treatment Center is now the Crossroads Research Initiative, a single source compiling psychedelic research data, offering expert consultations, clinical guidance, case studies and best practices for integrative psychedelic medicine.
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