Addiction After Injury: How Painkillers are Causing Heroin Addiction

Addiction After Injury: How Painkillers are Causing Heroin Addiction

It’s no secret that there’s a heroin epidemic raging across the US. Addiction statistics are off the charts when it comes to heroin use, and it’s affecting practically every demographic there is. Those most at risk? Quite often it’s those who have suffered an injury who run the greatest possibility of becoming someone who’s hooked on heroin. How Can Painkillers Prescribed for an Injury Lead to Heroin Use? It all stem from the prescription pain medication prescribed after someone’s suffered an injury. This means that many who get hurt (from teen athletes injured in sports to someone who slipped and broke their ankle) are given painkillers to take until their symptoms improve. The thing is, most of these prescription pain pills hold high potential for addiction–and this addiction is what often leads to heroin use. Heroin offers similar effects to prescription meds. It feeds addiction almost exactly the same way as painkillers do, and does so at a fraction of the cost. Painkillers can be expensive (and difficult to attain) on the black market, and heroin’s something that’s cheap. Not only that, but it’s readily available pretty much everywhere. So, once the addiction sets in, many search for more pain medications. After being addicted to pain medication addicts seek a cheaper solution, which often leads to heroin use. Prescription Medication Causes Dependency Prescription painkillers are also known as opioids. They work by reducing the amount of pain signals that reach the brain while influencing certain areas in the brain that control emotion. And while they certainly do provide pain relief (and sometimes feeling of euphoria), they are also causing the biggest opioid epidemic...
6 Tips to Avoid Relapse During the Holiday Season

6 Tips to Avoid Relapse During the Holiday Season

As holly jolly as the holidays are supposed to be, they sure bring on an overload of stress. And this “happiest time of the year” can actually be torture for someone in recovery. From holiday parties and family obligations to busy travel schedules and crowded shopping trips, the holidays come with a lot of expectations. For someone recovering from drug or alcohol addiction, these expectations can trigger some seriously stressful emotions. Family time can be stressful enough for anyone, and can be especially demanding on someone in recovery. The stress that family can trigger during the holidays can quickly make someone want to cope by using a substance. For those without a family, the holidays can be extremely lonely. The holiday blues are very real, especially for those who find themselves alone this time of year. For someone in recovery, feeling lonely is common even when it’s not the holidays. The holidays, however, can trigger even more intense emotions in the recovering addict without family or friends to share them with. The thought of a drink or two (or more) to cope with the stress of the holidays is normal for anyone, recovering addict or not. The holidays are a time for celebration, but you don’t need to drink or do drugs to do so. It’s the perfect time of year to celebrate sobriety. Give yourself a gift this holiday season and avoid relapse by sticking to the following tips: 6 Tips to Avoid Relapse During the Holidays Begin Each Day with a Plan Start each day out knowing exactly what you’re going to do. While this is a...
FDA Approved MDMA Clinical Trials Show Promise for People Who Suffer From PTSD

FDA Approved MDMA Clinical Trials Show Promise for People Who Suffer From PTSD

The only people who know how utterly exhausting and overwhelmingly difficult it is to heal from PTSD are the ones who have it. Intensely severe anxiety barely scratches the surface when trying to describe what PTSD is like. From panic attacks while awake and nightmares when asleep, PTSD can be seriously debilitating. PTSD develops in some people after they’ve been exposed to extreme psychological trauma. Things like sexual abuse, physical abuse, rape, torture, being kidnapped, plane crashes, natural disasters, and car accidents can all trigger the disorder, but it’s people who’ve engaged in war and active combat that have really brought the subject to light. It’s believed that 1 in 8 soldiers who return from war will experience some sort of PTSD. For some symptoms go away in a few months, but for others life can become a horrendous experience. The VA’s answer to fixing the trauma so many soldiers experience is usually antidepressants, but for most these do little but numb the pain. A New Solution There is hope, however, and it’s coming from a drug that the FDA has labelled as “having no medicinal value.” It’s called MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy, and is scheduled to soon start Phase 3 FDA clinical trials. If these trials go well (which many people are sure they will), MDMA may soon be available at your local pharmacy sold as prescription medication. This new decision springs from previous trials conducted with MDMA, as well as the most recent studies performed in Charleston, SC. These two trials concentrated on patients who had suffered from PTSD symptoms for an average of 17 years. It...
Ibogaine: Treatment for Alcoholism

Ibogaine: Treatment for Alcoholism

Alcoholism is one of the most common addictions there is. As something that’s readily available and even encouraged as a way to relax and have a good time, alcohol is widely consumed by people all over the world. In the US alone, there are more than 16 million people that are addicted to alcohol or abuse it on a regular basis. Alcohol addiction can perpetuate devastating consequences when it’s left untreated. Anyone who’s lived with an alcoholic, had a loved one who is an alcoholic, or been an alcoholic themselves knows just how quickly an addiction to alcohol can ruin someone’s life. Signs of Alcohol Abuse or Addiction What starts as a few drinks after work or letting loose on the weekends can turn into full-blown dependency. Drinking greatly loosens up one’s inhibitions and can literally numb one to the stress and problems they feel. This is why so many people turn to alcohol in the first place. It’s an easy way to let go…until one drinks too much or begins to come down from their high. Alcohol is a depressant by nature. While it might make someone feel great for little while, in the end it can lead to some serious withdrawal symptoms. The withdrawals from alcohol are what lead many to fall into a regular habit of drinking…because the only way to get rid of them is by drinking more. Detox from alcohol can also be waited out, but for many a few more drinks (“to take the edge off”) can quickly become a regular habit. Some of the sign alcohol has become a problem include: Drinking...
7 Common Misconceptions About Addiction

7 Common Misconceptions About Addiction

There are many misconceptions about addiction. Not only do these mistaken beliefs cause issues for the addict, but they can greatly impact society as well. Because these misconceptions can lead to a misunderstanding of what addiction really is, many addicts believe there’s little hope for recovery and maintaining a life of sobriety. Addiction is truly something surrounded by myth and misunderstanding. Shattering the illusion about addiction, however, can lead to an increase in the amount of people who seek (and successfully complete) addiction recovery. The following are some of the most common fallacies about addiction: Drug Addicts Fit a Certain Stereotype The stereotypical drug addict is someone who most people assume fits the addict profile. Some of the biggest myths regarding the stereotype of a drug addict include: Someone with a criminal history A person that steals from friends and family Someone of “lower” social standing A person with no ambition Someone who doesn’t have a job or is homeless People that are “bad” A person from a poor economic background The stereotypical view of an addict must be shattered. There isn’t a “type” of person that becomes addicted to drugs or alcohol. Addiction can happen to anyone regardless of gender, age, race, and economic standing. Misconceptions about addiction can also make some people believe they don’t have a problem if they believe they don’t fit the stereotype. Being an Addict Means You’ve Failed Because of the certain stereotypes that have come to exemplify addiction, many people think that because they’re an addict, they’ve somehow failed at life. And while using a substance is undoubtedly a choice, becoming an...
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