Oxycontin Addiction – Getting Help

Oxycontin Addiction – Getting Help

Oxycontin addiction has spread across the US and become one of the most abused substances there is. Widely prescribed to help people manage pain, it just so happens to be one of the most addictive prescriptions known. Oxycontin is formulated from opioids, the based drug for many modern medicines as well as heroin. Opiate prescriptions have become all too familiar on the medical scene. Addiction to opiates, especially oxycontin, happens more than many people realize. The number of addicts grows every year, with some two million Americans dependent on or abusing prescription opioids such as Oxycontin. Why is Oxycontin so Addictive? The Addictive Dangers of an Oxycontin Addiction Although Oxycontin is prescribed to help people with pain, it’s still an opioid. This means it poses an extremely high potential for abuse. A person taking Oxycontin for pain often finds themselves with more than they bargained for. An addiction to Oxycontin can go virtually unnoticed, until a person tries to stop. This is because the more a person takes an opioid (in this case Oxycontin), the more they need to achieve the desired effect. Oxycontin works by connecting to various opiate receptors in the brain. It triggers a massive release of dopamine–which not only masks a person’s pain but also elicits a sense of comfortable euphoria. It can make a person feel amazing, comfortably relaxed without a care in the world. This is why countless people abuse Oxycontin on a regular basis. Snorting or injecting Oxycontin only intensifies this pleasurable effect, something that has people continually seeking out this “legal” substance on a regular basis. For people that become addicted to...
The Psyche Of Addiction: Uncovering the Real Cause of Substance Abuse and Dependency Issues

The Psyche Of Addiction: Uncovering the Real Cause of Substance Abuse and Dependency Issues

As addiction rates continue to skyrocket around the world, more people are looking for an understanding of addition itself. Is addiction really the substance itself, or is there something deeper within the individual that instigates the addiction in the first place? There is a stigma attached to addiction that carries an extremely negative connotation towards an addict. Addiction, however, can affect anyone. No one is immune from becoming dependent on drugs or alcohol. There’s a common misconception that addiction happens to “bad people” or those who lack willpower. Nothing could be further from the truth. Most addiction stems from pain. It’s the people who’ve experienced some kind of trauma who most often end up becoming addicted to drugs or alcohol, not people who lack some moral compass. Substance abuse is also common amongst those suffering from depression and other mental health issues. Reaching for drugs or alcohol to lift one’s mood is an easy escape and can, unfortunately, turn into a serious problem. Childhood Trauma and Addiction It’s well-known that what a person experiences in childhood has a direct influence on what their life will be like in the future. When a child grows up in a stressful environment, they’re more likely to experience addiction later on in life. Abuse, neglect, and exposure to extremely stressful situations all increase a person’s chances of becoming addicted to drugs or alcohol. There’s a growing body of research that suggests that what a person experiences in childhood will directly influence their likelihood of becoming an addict later in life. Take the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACEs) study for instance. It included approximately 17,000...
Bad Trips Gone Good: What We Can Learn from a Difficult Psychedelic Experience

Bad Trips Gone Good: What We Can Learn from a Difficult Psychedelic Experience

While taking psychedelics for a medicinal or spiritual experience can be an extremely enlightening and healing experience, there is always the probability that what a person goes through isn’t what they’d hoped for. A negative psychedelic experience can be extremely frightening, and truly show a person the aspects of their subconscious they’d rather leave alone. What a Bad Trip is Here to Teach Us The effects of a “bad trip” can last for days or even weeks after the experience, leaving a person wondering if psychedelic medicine actually holds the potential for healing so many people claim. A negative psychedelic experience, however, can be a blessing in disguise. Having an adverse reaction to psychedelics can show a person the emotional and psychological issues they carry that need to be healed. It’s the negative things a person goes through during a bad trip that are most often the problems they need to address the most. Psychedelics are powerful conduits for change, and, when used for healing, they can bring up some very serious emotions and feelings. Having this insight can make it a lot easier to see the positive side when something like this occurs. After all, it’s often through difficulty that we experience tremendous change. The only way out is through–and a challenging psychedelic experience is here to show a person exactly the problems they need to work out in order to experience the healing they need. This understanding can make a tremendous difference when looking for insight through psychedelic healing. Do You Need to Have a Difficult Experience to Heal? While having a difficult experience on psychedelics can offer more awareness of the...
The Crossroads Treatment Center is now the Crossroads Research Initiative, a single source compiling psychedelic research data, offering expert consultations, clinical guidance, case studies and best practices for integrative psychedelic medicine.
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