Could Ketamine Be the Answer for Alcohol Addiction?

Could Ketamine Be the Answer for Alcohol Addiction?

Alcohol addiction is the most widespread form of substance abuse disorders. Not only is alcohol legal, but it is typically encouraged as a way to relax and have a good time. According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH), there are over 15 million people in the US alone that abuse alcohol on a regular basis. And while there are countless rehab options to treat alcoholism, it’s widely known that traditional rehab doesn’t always work. The very programs that have been touted to tame the alcoholic mind for almost a hundred years (think AA and other 12-step programs) only come with a 5-10 percent success rate. And when it comes to something as important as overcoming an addiction to alcohol, the last thing anyone wants to be is a statistic. It’s reasons such as these that have countless people turning to alternative forms of treatment to overcome addictions to alcohol and other substances. Can Ketamine Help with Alcohol Addiction? Research is in the works that could help countless people suffering from alcoholism overcome their addiction for good. Some scientists are suggesting that ketamine (currently considered a recreational drug) could be an excellent aid in the treatment of alcohol addiction. Researchers at the University College of London (UCL) are testing whether or not ketamine can be effective in changing negative patterns of behavior associated with alcoholism by erasing the memories and triggers that lead to substance abuse and addiction. While results from these tests won’t be published for more than a year, researchers behind the study remain hopeful. The research that began in 2016 has showed promise...
Meditation and Addiction Recovery

Meditation and Addiction Recovery

With many people taking a holistic approach to treating addiction, meditation has become an integral aspect of many addiction recovery programs. Meditation has been used in Eastern cultures for years, and has recently found its way into Western culture as countless people turn toward more natural ways of taking care of their body and mind. And, while not considered a cure-all for those overcoming addiction, meditation is unprecedented at increasing self-awareness, combating stress and anxiety, decreasing negative emotional response, and helping increase connection. 5 Ways Meditation Helps in Addiction Recovery #1 – Lowers Stress Levels It’s no secret that stress leads to substance abuse. Anyone who has struggled with addiction is familiar with the immediate urge to use when hit with stressful situations. Whether it’s cigarettes, alcohol, heroin, cocaine, or food…when stress hits the addicted brain, the desire to numb it with a person’s drug of choice is clearly evident. A regular meditation practice can help relieve stress and invoke a sense of calm that permeates a person’s presence even when they aren’t meditating. Meditation works in harmony with the central nervous system, guiding a person out of “fight or flight” mode and into an oasis of increased calm and awareness. Meditating even five minutes a day can significantly reduce the stress that leads to compulsive drug or alcohol abuse. #2 – Increases Dopamine Levels Drugs and alcohol increase dopamine levels in the reward centers of the brain, part of which makes a person feel good when they’re high. When their drug of choice begins to wear off, however, dopamine levels plummet to levels lower than they were before using. This is what...
The Role of Environment in Addiction Recovery

The Role of Environment in Addiction Recovery

Overcoming an addiction is one of the most difficult things a person will face in their lifetime. Addiction literally changes the way the brain functions and is all too often devastating for individuals and their families. Anyone who has beaten an addiction to drugs and alcohol knows that recovery is far from over when the addiction ends. Addiction affects each person differently. And while some people can easily get over an addiction, many struggle to get their life back on track after successfully quitting their drug of choice. For some, recovery is a lifelong process. For others, it many take months or years to fully recovery from an addiction. Environment plays a crucial role in overcoming addiction. The more comfortable and supportive a person’s environment, the better their chances of successfully sustaining their sobriety for good. A person who has just gotten over an addiction, whether through treatment or on their own, must contend with an entirely new reality. Without a proper structure and supportive environment, relapse can become a very unfortunate reality. Changing Your Environment Changing your environment can be an amazing help if you have recently overcome an addiction. Surrounding yourself with the people and places that remind you of your addiction can quickly lead to the triggers that ultimately lead you directly back to addiction. Changing your environment is a critical aspect of successfully staying sober and embracing this new life. 4 Tips to Change Your Environment While Recovering from Addiction #1 – Get Rid of Old “Friends” Chances are, the “friends” you used to hang out with when you were using weren’t really your friends...
The Connection Between ADHD and Addiction

The Connection Between ADHD and Addiction

Adult attention deficit disorder (ADHD) is a mental health condition that starts early in childhood and effects some 3 million Americans. When left untreated or undiagnosed, it can be carried into one’s adult life, leading to poor work performance, unstable relationships, difficulty concentrating, and impulsive behavior. Symptoms of ADHD Everyone will display ADHD differently. Some common symptoms of this often-frustrating mental condition include: Anxiety Becoming easily bored Difficulty concentrating Problems controlling anger/Violent outbursts Mood swings Problems at work Procrastination Low self-esteem Depression Relationship problems People experience ADHD differently and the symptoms people display won’t always be the same. Some people can manage their ADHD fine and not become affected, while others have increased difficulty in handling the way the disorder makes them feel. Some people that suffer from ADHD will have trouble concentrating on a task unless it’s something that interests them, while others will find it hard to focus on anything for a given length of time, no matter how interesting they think it is. One person might be antisocial and withdrawn, while the next loves being around people. Why are ADHD and Addiction So Closely Related? Adults with ADHD are more likely to become addicted to cigarettes, drugs, alcohol, and other substances. While the reason people with ADHD are more prone to addiction isn’t completely clear, there are certain characteristics of those that suffer from ADHD that are likely to lead to the progress of addiction. Research suggests that approximately 25 percent of adults who are treated for drug and alcohol addiction also have ADHD. Many believe that the impulsive behavior associated with ADHD is directly linked...
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