Addiction After Injury: How Painkillers are Causing Heroin Addiction  Copy

Addiction After Injury: How Painkillers are Causing Heroin Addiction Copy

It’s no secret that there’s a heroin epidemic raging across the US. Addiction statistics are off the charts when it comes to heroin use, and it’s affecting practically every demographic there is. Those most at risk? Quite often it’s those who have suffered an injury who run the greatest possibility of becoming someone who’s hooked on heroin. How Can Painkillers Prescribed for an Injury Lead to Heroin Use? It all stem from the prescription pain medication prescribed after someone’s suffered an injury. This means that many who get hurt (from teen athletes injured in sports to someone who slipped and broke their ankle) are given painkillers to take until their symptoms improve. The thing is, most of these prescription pain pills hold high potential for addiction–and this addiction is what often leads to heroin use. Heroin offers similar effects to prescription meds. It feeds addiction almost exactly the same way as painkillers do, and does so at a fraction of the cost. Painkillers can be expensive (and difficult to attain) on the black market, and heroin’s something that’s cheap. Not only that, but it’s readily available pretty much everywhere. So, once the addiction sets in, many search for more pain medications. After being addicted to pain medication addicts seek a cheaper solution, which often leads to heroin use. Prescription Medication Causes Dependency Prescription painkillers are also known as opioids. They work by reducing the amount of pain signals that reach the brain while influencing certain areas in the brain that control emotion. And while they certainly do provide pain relief (and sometimes feeling of euphoria), they are also causing the biggest opioid epidemic...
Addiction After Injury: How Painkillers are Causing Heroin Addiction

Addiction After Injury: How Painkillers are Causing Heroin Addiction

It’s no secret that there’s a heroin epidemic raging across the US. Addiction statistics are off the charts when it comes to heroin use, and it’s affecting practically every demographic there is. Those most at risk? Quite often it’s those who have suffered an injury who run the greatest possibility of becoming someone who’s hooked on heroin. How Can Painkillers Prescribed for an Injury Lead to Heroin Use? It all stem from the prescription pain medication prescribed after someone’s suffered an injury. This means that many who get hurt (from teen athletes injured in sports to someone who slipped and broke their ankle) are given painkillers to take until their symptoms improve. The thing is, most of these prescription pain pills hold high potential for addiction–and this addiction is what often leads to heroin use. Heroin offers similar effects to prescription meds. It feeds addiction almost exactly the same way as painkillers do, and does so at a fraction of the cost. Painkillers can be expensive (and difficult to attain) on the black market, and heroin’s something that’s cheap. Not only that, but it’s readily available pretty much everywhere. So, once the addiction sets in, many search for more pain medications. After being addicted to pain medication addicts seek a cheaper solution, which often leads to heroin use. Prescription Medication Causes Dependency Prescription painkillers are also known as opioids. They work by reducing the amount of pain signals that reach the brain while influencing certain areas in the brain that control emotion. And while they certainly do provide pain relief (and sometimes feeling of euphoria), they are also causing the biggest opioid epidemic...
How Ibogaine Offers Hope to Heroin Addicts

How Ibogaine Offers Hope to Heroin Addicts

Heroin use has truly become the worst drug problem the nation has ever seen. Where once methamphetamine and cocaine reigned, heroin has become the new drug of choice…and it’s bringing an entirely new face to the stereotype of addiction. You see, with heroin use there is no typical demographic. It’s affecting everyone from the inner city to the upper class and is one of the biggest drug epidemics ever known. As one of the most addictive drugs known to man, heroin use is sweeping the nation unlike any drug ever before. Many speculate the rise in heroin use is closely connected to the rise in the number of prescription opioids that are widely prescribed these days. Opioids are extremely addictive, so much so that there are some 2 million people in the US alone that suffer from dependency to these prescription pills. Pills however, tend to be expensive. Especially when you’re purchasing them on the black market to feed your dependency. Here is where heroin steps in. Many people find that not only is heroin much cheaper and easier to attain than prescription opioids, but makes them feel a euphoria they’ve never experienced before. Someone can become hooked on heroin the very first time they try it. And, unfortunately, it’s a drug that doesn’t let you give it up so easily. Symptoms of Heroin Use and Addiction No matter how a person comes to depend on heroin, the consequences of this addiction are terrible. Being addicted to heroin (or watching a loved one suffer from heroin addiction) can be a nightmare. Heroin is abused because of the elated feelings...

The Rising Heroin Epidemic

It’s no secret that heroin use is on the rise. In case you haven’t heard, heroin has become the new drug of choice. And while alcohol, meth, and cocaine abuse haven’t gone away, heroin addiction now surpasses every other addiction there is. Just how much has heroin use exploded in the past decade or so? A lot. And while even a little is too much, between 2002 and 2013 heroin-related overdose deaths increased 286 percent. In 2013, nearly 500,000 people admitted to using heroin in the past year. That’s almost a half a million people using heroin, which must account for the approximately 30 that die every single day from its use. Who is Using Heroin? According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), heroin use is spread amongst several different demographics and is not constitute of one particular “kind” of person. In fact, these days heroin use is most widespread throughout white suburban neighborhoods than any other location in the country. Where before heroin use was primarily found amongst minorities in inner-city neighborhoods, it’s now found to be mainly used by whites who live outside large urban areas. But it doesn’t stop there, heroin is being used by everyone—white, black, male, female, young, and old, no one is immune. The use of heroin has leaked into many different parts of society. The people most prone to heroin addiction are white males between the ages of 18 and 25 who make less than $20,000 a year. The largest increase in users was actually found in groups of people that aren’t typically exposed to heroin—think educated men and women in...
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